Efforts to Conceal

A collection of things I like and wish you did too.
ouzklc:

Hangi minaresi guneste parliyodu ki? :/ #suleymaniyekulliyesi #suleymaniye #fatih #yarimada

ouzklc:

Hangi minaresi guneste parliyodu ki? :/ #suleymaniyekulliyesi #suleymaniye #fatih #yarimada

(via ouzklc-deactivated20140718)

nedsef:

Koca Mi’mâr Sinân Âğâ (Ottoman Turkish: معمار سينان; Modern Turkish: Mimar Sinan, pronounced [miːˈmaːɾ siˈnan]) (c. 1489/1490 – July 17, 1588) was the chief Ottoman architect (Turkish: “Mimar”) and civil engineer for sultans Suleiman the Magnificent, Selim II, and Murad III. He was responsible for the construction of more than three hundred major structures and other more modest projects, such as his Islamic primary schools (sibyan mektebs). His apprentices would later design the Sultan Ahmed Mosque in Istanbul, Stari Most in Mostar and help design theTaj Mahal in the Mughal Empire.
The son of a stonemason, he received a technical education and became a military engineer. He rose rapidly through the ranks to become first an officer and finally a Janissary commander, with the honorific title of ağa.[1] He refined his architectural and engineering skills while on campaign with the Janissaries, becoming expert at constructing fortifications of all kinds, as well as military infrastructure projects, such as roads, bridges and aqueducts.[2] At about the age of fifty, he was appointed as chief royal architect, applying the technical skills he had acquired in the army to the “creation of fine religious buildings” and civic structures of all kinds.[2] He remained in post for almost fifty years.His masterpiece is the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne, although his most famous work is the Suleiman Mosque in Istanbul. He headed an extensive governmental department and trained many assistants who, in turn, distinguished themselves, including Sedefkar Mehmed Agha, architect of the Sultan Ahmed Mosque. He is considered the greatest architect of the classical period of Ottoman architecture, and has been compared to Michelangelo, his contemporary in the West.[3][4] Michelangelo and his plans for St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome were well known in Istanbul, since Leonardo da Vinci and he had been invited, in 1502 and 1505 respectively, by the Sublime Porte to submit plans for a bridge spanning the Golden Horn.[5]

nedsef:

Koca Mi’mâr Sinân Âğâ (Ottoman Turkishمعمار سينانModern TurkishMimar Sinanpronounced [miːˈmaːɾ siˈnan]) (c. 1489/1490 – July 17, 1588) was the chief Ottoman architect (Turkish: “Mimar”) and civil engineer for sultans Suleiman the MagnificentSelim II, and Murad III. He was responsible for the construction of more than three hundred major structures and other more modest projects, such as his Islamic primary schools (sibyan mektebs). His apprentices would later design the Sultan Ahmed Mosque in IstanbulStari Most in Mostar and help design theTaj Mahal in the Mughal Empire.

The son of a stonemason, he received a technical education and became a military engineer. He rose rapidly through the ranks to become first an officer and finally a Janissary commander, with the honorific title of ağa.[1] He refined his architectural and engineering skills while on campaign with the Janissaries, becoming expert at constructing fortifications of all kinds, as well as military infrastructure projects, such as roads, bridges and aqueducts.[2] At about the age of fifty, he was appointed as chief royal architect, applying the technical skills he had acquired in the army to the “creation of fine religious buildings” and civic structures of all kinds.[2] He remained in post for almost fifty years.His masterpiece is the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne, although his most famous work is the Suleiman Mosque in Istanbul. He headed an extensive governmental department and trained many assistants who, in turn, distinguished themselves, including Sedefkar Mehmed Agha, architect of the Sultan Ahmed Mosque. He is considered the greatest architect of the classical period of Ottoman architecture, and has been compared to Michelangelo, his contemporary in the West.[3][4] Michelangelo and his plans for St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome were well known in Istanbul, since Leonardo da Vinci and he had been invited, in 1502 and 1505 respectively, by the Sublime Porte to submit plans for a bridge spanning the Golden Horn.[5]

kimepowell:

as seen atop of the Süleymaniye Camii.
'Tambourines'
03.2014
Kim E. Powell 

kimepowell:

as seen atop of the Süleymaniye Camii.

'Tambourines'

03.2014

Kim E. Powell 

trendgroup:

Istanbul silhouette #Suleymaniye #mosque #seagull #gull #minaret #sunset #sundown #galata #lookinist #istanbul #turkiye #wanderlust #travel #mystic #mystical #orient #dragonfly #bird

trendgroup:

Istanbul silhouette #Suleymaniye #mosque #seagull #gull #minaret #sunset #sundown #galata #lookinist #istanbul #turkiye #wanderlust #travel #mystic #mystical #orient #dragonfly #bird

The brain appears to possess a special area which we might call poetic memory and which records everything that charms or touches us, that makes our lives beautiful.

Milan Kundera, from The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Gallimard, 1984)

(Source: rabbitinthemoon, via weatheredwood)

I am hoping you are the missing think thing. Your letter filled the hole in my day like a key. Turn it.

Bill Callahan from Letters to Emma Bowlcut (via lebkuchens)

lostandfoundinprague:

Night Prague by G.Pinkhassov, 1994

lostandfoundinprague:

Night Prague by G.Pinkhassov, 1994

(Source: ssmylook, via goldist)

annefrankzappa:

This is literally the best post I’ve ever made, so I’m bringing it back.

(via xoxohoneybunny)